Several GOP presidential hopefuls, who are short of qualifying for the party’s first primary debate in August, have begun to kick campaigning into overdrive to ensure they meet the thresholds needed to land a spot on the debate stage.

“We make the polling requirement very easily,” former Vice President Mike Pence told CNN’s “State of the Union” on Sunday, referring to the poll-standing and donor requirements for debate candidates. “But yeah, having 40,000 individual donors, we’re literally working around the clock … I’m confident that we’ll be there.”

“We make the polling requirement very easily,” former Vice President Mike Pence told CNN’s “State of the Union” on Sunday, referring to the poll-standing and donor requirements for debate candidates. “But yeah, having 40,000 individual donors, we’re literally working around the clock … I’m confident that we’ll be there.”

So far, at least six candidates appear on track to meet the Republican Party’s qualification metrics, and eight are still vying for a spot on stage.

Those six candidates state they have already met the Republican National Committee’s donor threshold as well as the polling threshold, which requires that they garner at least 1% of support in three independent national polls, or two national polls and one independent poll from two of four early voting states. 

For many, all that remains is for each candidate to take the GOP’s pledges, which includes a controversial commitment to back the eventual nominee. 

The six candidates who appear to qualify are as follows:

Former President Donald Trump was among the first candidates to announce their intention to run and has sat squarely in the lead on nearly every poll that has been released since that time. There’s little question about whether or not he would meet the debate criteria, but there is uncertainty about whether or not he will participate. 

“Ronald Reagan didn’t do it, and a lot of other people didn’t do it. When you have a big lead, you don’t do it,” Trump said in a recent Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures” interview.

“I have a lead of 50 and 60 points in some cases,” he said. “You’re leading people by 50 and 60 points, you say why would you be doing a debate? It’s actually not fair.”

Longtime Trump adviser Jason Miller has hinted that Trump is likely to skip the first two debates.

Trump’s primary competition has been Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, who has already met both the donor and polling requirements. DeSantis has already said he intends to debate and hit out at Trump for his uncertainty. 

“Nobody is entitled to this nomination. You have got to earn the nomination and doing things like The Family Leader event in Iowa, doing things like these debates — they’re important parts of the process,” DeSantis said on “The Howie Carr Show” earlier this month.

Multimillionaire entrepreneur Vivek Ramaswamy recently shot into third place in the RealClearPolitics average of polls, and stated recently that he has met the thresholds.

“The RNC’s debate stage criteria are stringent but fair,” Ramaswamy said in a recent statement. “If an outsider can clear the bar, politically experienced candidates should be able to as well.”

Nikki Haley, the former U.S. ambassador to the UN and former South Carolina governor, recently revealed that she has met the donor requirement for the debate. Given that she sits currently with a 3.4 percentage points in the latest RealClearPolitics aggregate among GOP voters, she seems to have met the polling criteria as well. 

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