Presidential hopeful Vivek Ramaswamy outlined a bold plan to eliminate the Federal Bureau of Investigation if he is elected president in the 2024 general election.

Ramaswamy explained the President of the United States has authority to shutter agencies such as the FBI, and terminate its employees without congressional approval.

“The U.S. president already has statutory authority,” explained Ramaswamy to talk show host Glenn Beck. “The Presidential Reorganization Act of 1977 says you can shut down redundant agencies.”

“Well, when I look at what the DEA does and what the U.S. Marshals do, there’s my legal justification for shutting down the FBI without asking Congress for permission or forgiveness,” he added.

Ramaswamy, a Republican presidential candidate, supports closing the FBI in light of the findings from Special Counsel John Durham’s report.

Durham was appointed special counsel in 2020 by then-Attorney General William Barr. His mandate was to examine investigations of alleged collusion between Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and Russia.

His final report, which the Department of Justice released, details the false nature of the persecution against the 45th president by the nation’s premier law enforcement agency. The illustrious agency’s shine has dulled.

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The presidential contender made it clear he would pardon those involved in what he categorizes as politicized prosecutions, promising to extend such a pardon even to former President Trump.

The aspiring president envisions a reduction of the administrative state.

Ramaswamy explained civil service law does not stand in the way of mass terminations, a strategy he seems prepared to deploy in Washington, D.C.

“Civil service protections protect against the individual firings of employees for supposedly political reasons,” Ramaswamy informed Beck. “They do not apply to mass layoffs, and mass layoffs are absolutely what I’m bringing to Washington, D.C.”

Ramaswamy’s stance raises questions about the future of U.S. federal agencies and sparks a new debate on the presidential powers to restructure or dissolve such entities.

While the practical implications of this approach are yet to be fully realized, it underscores the candidate’s commitment to shrinking the administrative state.

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